Cultrual Enrichment: Event Resources

 

Native American Healthcare

The March 5-6, 2012 event featured a documentary by Cherokee award-winning filmmakers Steven Heape and Chip Ritchie. In Don't Get Sick After June:  American Indian Healthcare, they tell a story from the Native American prospective. View the slides from the presentation PDF document (image)Angel and Lance Cully of the Center for American Indian Community Health were the second day's featured speakers, presenting, Local and Regional Tribes & Resources.

ABCs of LGBT Health 

The April 28, 2011, event, co-sponsored by the KUMC diversity initiative, LBGT and Allies, and Dr. Chuck Sturgis, featured the presentation, The ABCs of LGBT Health, including the Role of the Nurse, and a workshop, Caring for LGBT Patients, by Shane Snowdon, director of the UCSF Center for the LGBT Health & Equity.  The event also included a presentation, LGBT Health - A Whirlwind Tour,  a student reception and a strategy session of leadership from KU Medical Center and The University of Kansas Hospital.

Understanding Islam for Today's Health Professional

Mahnaz Shabbir, author of I am an American Muslim Woman and Kansas City resident, was the keynote speaker for the Sept. 15, 2010 event, which also included a faculty and staff discusson about cultural differences and the impact on patient care.  .

Pictured from left: Jennifer Keeton; Dean Karen L. Miller, RN, PhD; Mahnaz Shabbir; and Elaine Frank-Ragan, PhD, RN

Pictured from left: Dean Karen L. Miller, RN, PhD; Mahnaz Shabbir; and Elaine Frank-Ragan, PhD, RN

Shabbir has worked for health care organizations but is not a health care provider, has been leading interfaith prayer services and has been giving talks to schools, churches and hospitals for many years. She believes communication is key to understanding differences, especially for health care professionals. Being aware of a patient's culture and faith can have an impact on how care is given and received. And dispelling myths about Islam is one of Shabbir's personal goals.

"The silent moderate Muslim community can no longer be silent," Shabbir said. "We have to share ourselves with others so our children won't face discrimination and racism."

The events of September 11 have caused more concern. But the need to share and dispel misunderstandings is greater, Shabbir added. "I try to make a difference. We have a voice. We need to use it. As a strategic planner, I have to educate not to hate." More on Shabbir 
Handouts: CPS-Islam-3 PDF document (image)     Mahnazs Brochure3 PDF document (image)

Silent Racism: How Well-Meaning White People Silent Racism Book Cover
Perpetuate the Racial Divide, March 26, 2010

Lecture and discussion by author Barbara Trepagnier, PhD

More information: www.silentracism.com 
Continuing education packet PDF document (image) 
Watch video of the presentation PDF document (image)

"The audio during the first couple of minutes is not as good as we wanted, so please allow the segment to play until the audio evens out. We apologize for this.

2nd KCK Day for Faculty Cultural Enrichment, February 26, 2010

We visited 3-4 agencies around Kansas City, Kan., to learn about our neighbors and the specific health issues facing our local population. Participants got to see first-hand the obstacles and struggles patients and providers encounter daily. This experience is designed to increase your level of knowledge about the health issues and services available in our immediate area. The event also increases visibility of KU in the community and provides an opportunity for camaraderie, brainstorming, and networking.

1st KCK Day for Faculty Cultural Enrichment, September 28, 2009

The first KCK Day involved nine participants who visited the following five locations in Kansas City, Kan. : Bethel Neighborhood Center, Metropolitan Lutheran Ministries, Willa Gill Center, YWCA of Greater Kansas City and Wyandot Center.
KCK Day photo collage (images)

Cultural Enrichment After Hours, August 10, 2009

Faculty gathered off campus for a social and discussion focusing on the online learning tool Quality Interactions. Participants shared their opinions about the product and discussed ways in which cultural content can be enhanced across the curriculum.

An Afghanistan Experience, April 2009

Sponsored by the Enhancement Program for Cultural Enrichment and the KUMC Diversity Initiative, faculty, staff and students from the School of Nursing and across the medical center campus participated in a three-part event in April 2009. Particpants were encouraged to read books (Three Cups of Tea, The Kite Runner, or A Thousand Splendid Suns) and then watch The Beauty Academy of Kabul, in the KU School of Nursing auditorium. The event concluded with a follow-up discussion with guest speaker Mike Hicks, who was a civilian medic in Afghanistan. The books, movie and Mr. Hick's experience were discussed in the context of health care, current events, and culture. View the trailer for The Beauty Academy of Kabul

Fall All-School Retreat, August 20, 2008

"Strategies for Effective Cultural Communication" featuring Kathy Mayle as guest speaker for the retreat.

Spring Kick-Off: "Conversations on Cultural Awareness," May 9, 2008

The kick-off event was the beginning of a long-term effort to enhance our knowledge about each other, the patients and students we serve, and to learn of ways to integrate this knowledge into the nursing curriculum and our professional and personal lives.

Our goal for this day-long event was to provide a relaxing atmosphere to encourage discussions while inviting you to reflect and become open to activities we will have in the future. We hope you found the kick-off to be welcoming - a chance to share our own experiences and learn about the experiences of our colleagues. Guest facilitator for the kick-off event was Myra Christopher, President and CEO, Center for Practical Bioethics.

 

Last modified: May 30, 2014
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